Liberal Arts Blog — Have You Thanked Your Aponeuroses Lately? Three in Particular….

Liberal Arts Blog — Wednesday is the Joy of Science, Engineering, and Technology Day

Today’s Topic — Have You Thanked Your Aponeuroses Lately? Three in Particular….

Keeping it together matters. If we didn’t, we’d fall apart, right? Well, aponeuroses help us do that. They are connective tissue — like tendons and ligaments, but different. Tendons are “tough and rope like.” Aponeuroses are “delicate” and “sheath-like.” Today, a few details on three notable ones — the “linea alba” on your front; the “galea” on the top of your head, , and the ESA of your back. I think of tendons as facilitating movement and aponeuroses ensuring stability — flip sides of the dual function of our miraculous muscular-skeletal system. Experts — please chime in. Correct, elaborate, elucidate.

THE LINEA ALBA — from your sternum to your public bone — anchors your core

1. It’s the white stuff that separates the right and left side of your “six pack” (aka “rectus abdominis).

2. “Conditions like pregnancy and obesity can cause weakness in the linea alba. For example, as your uterus expands and the abdominal wall is stretched outward, your linea alba separates. As a result, the linea alba loses elasticity and weakens. A condition called diastasis reciti occurs when the abdominal muscles remain separated and cause a bulge in the abdomen.”

3. “The linea nigra is a dark vertical line that appears on the skin of your stomach during pregnancy. It’s also called the pregnancy line. It runs from your belly button to your public area. In some people, the line extends to the breastbone.”

NB: The linea alba is also a mode of access for abdominal surgeons. There are few nerves and blood vessels relative to alternatives. The downside is that healing is proportionately slower.

THE ROMAN ARMY HELMET ON TOP YOUR HEAD — THE “GALEA APONEUROTICA” (“1” in image below)

1. Roman soldiers wore “close fitting leather helmets” called “galea.”

2. One of five layers of the scalp. The others are: skin, deep connective tissue, loose areolar connective tissue and periosteum.

3. Is there a connection between the “galea” and male pattern baldness? Some claim yes. (See third link below)

ERECTOR SPINAE APONEUROSIS (ESA) — “breathing, posture, load transfer”

  1. Key for “breathing, posture, and load transfer.”

2. “It blends with your thoracolumbar fascia (TLF). Your TLF is another dense connective tissue that surrounds your back muscles.”

3. “Together, your ESA and TLF separate your spinal muscles from the muscles in your abdominal wall.”

QUOTE OF THE MONTH:

“The single biggest challenge in communication is the illusion that it has taken place.”

(William H. Whyte, author of The Organization Man” (1856)

A LINK TO THE LAST FOUR YEARS OF POSTS ORGANIZED BY THEME:

ATTACHMENT BELOWS -

— Adams House Senior Common Room Presentation, 11/17/20

YOUR TURN

Please share the coolest thing you learned this week related to science, engineering, or technology. Or, even better, the coolest or most important thing you learned in your life related to science and engineering.

This is your chance to make someone else’s day. Or to cement in your mind something that you might otherwise forget. Or to think more deeply about something dear to your heart. Continuity is key to depth of thought.

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